No menu items!

Why is cannibalism no longer a taboo subject?

World Economic Forum, Why is cannibalism no longer a taboo subject?

While green utopians at the World Economic Forum (WEF) and elsewhere are promoting the imminent food crisis in various ways, a campaign is simultaneously taking place on the media level to make “climate-friendly protein sources” socially acceptable. Such as fried insects, cockroach milk, and many more.

Recently, Hollywood celebrities have been staged in front of the camera, distorting notch animals to get viewers to stop eating fish and meat in time. Public appearances by pop culture representatives who allow themselves to be instrumentalized as promoters of political agendas are an indication of the seriousness of the situation.

Read also: Check out our coverage on curated alternative narratives

In other words, the radical implementation of the respective ‘Creep’ mission is imminent. So get ready to see an oversupply of insects on supermarket shelves while fresh meat and fish become increasingly unaffordable for the masses.

(Reese Report)

But the wealth of ideas of the misanthropic world leaders open up even more sinister abysses. In the future, the human diet will be expanded not only by arthropods but also by bipeds.

Yes, you read that right – human flesh.

We also belong to the old-fashioned ones who find the mere idea of it extremely shuddering and frightening. But admittedly, since the advent of the pandemic age, hardly anything has shocked us. Everything is possible. You have to reckon with everything.

The impact of this normally hard-to-digest information was accordingly soberingly limited. Somehow, since the launch of the insect campaign, a subliminal premonition has set in that Homo Sapiens will be fed to each other in the near future. And now, unfortunately, this intuitive presumption that lay dormant within us has become flesh.

Cannibalism is experiencing unprecedented normalization. The corresponding narrative has abruptly gone from a creeping process to progressive indoctrination.

(A celebrity promoting the food sources/choices driven by Agenda 2030)

The British Daily Mail lets us know that British royalty dined on human flesh long ago, insinuating that if Royalty can do it, we can do it too. The American Conservative titled “Cannibalism is … cool,” and Bigthink explains why a Swedish scientists advocates eating humans. Just to name a few.

Surprising was also to see how many mainstream media printed this headline and the story that went with it “Burger that tastes like human flesh despite being vegan wins top award”. Yes, human flesh apparently tastes real yummy.

Since climate change was again hyped up as the “world’s greatest threat” immediately after this year’s “Covid Summer Hole,” cannibalism has received suspiciously increased attention.

This actual taboo subject, which serves television programs, films, series, literature, news articles, columns, etc., is now mushrooming.

Is there a large-scale euphemistic dumbing down going on right now, seemingly aimed solely at converting man-eating skeptics?

Recently, New York Times took up this hot potato in an overly tolerant manner, writing almost ingratiatingly:

“It turns out that cannibalism has a time and a place. In some stomach-turning books, on television or on movie screens, Ms.Summers and others suggest that time has come.”

Incidentally, a company that makes salami from human tissue already did so. The extravagant meat processor, Bite Labs, advertises on its homepage with the slogan: “Dine on celebrity meat.”

In a short promo video, the company explains that they take cells from celebrities, grow them into muscle meat, and use it to make their “artisanal salami.” This is supposed to make you feel even closer to your beloved starlet. It’s a mad world!

Join us on Telegram: t.me/theriotimes

Check out our other content