Peer-reviewed study links Covid-19 vaccines to 25% increase in cardiac arrest for both males and females

Study based on data from emergency services. Covid infection itself not linked to significant increase in cardiovascular complications.

Covid-19 vaccines, Peer-reviewed study links Covid-19 vaccines to 25% increase in cardiac arrest for both males and females

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – A new study by Israeli researchers published in Nature on April 28 has revealed an increase of over 25% in cardiovascular-related emergency calls in the young-adult population following the rollout of Covid-19 vaccines among both males and females. No similar increase was found due to Covid-19 infection alone.

However, recent articles in scientific journals suggest that cardiovascular complications following Covid-19 infection are more common than those following vaccination.

This assertion is contradicted by the findings from Israeli researchers, using data from Israel National Emergency Medical Services (EMS) related to “cardiac arrest and acute coronary syndrome EMS calls in the 16–39-year-old population” between 2019 and 2021.

Peer-reviewed study links Covid-19 vaccines to 25% increase in cardiac arrest for both males and females. (Photo internet reproduction)
Peer-reviewed study links Covid-19 vaccines to 25% increase in cardiac arrest for both males and females. (Photo internet reproduction)

This enabled them to compare a baseline (pre-epidemic) to the Covid-19 epidemic without vaccines to the Covid-19 epidemic following widespread vaccine takeup. They detected an increase of over 25% in both cases during January–May 2021, compared with the years 2019–2020.

That is to say, “increased rates of vaccination … are associated with an increased number of CA [cardiac arrest] and ACS [acute coronary syndrome].” The trial “did not detect a statistically significant association between the Covid-19 infection rates and the CA and ACS weekly call counts.”

They caution that given these findings, “It is essential to raise awareness among patients and clinicians with respect to related symptoms (e.g., chest discomfort and shortness of breath) following vaccination or Covid-19 infection to ensure that potential harm is minimized.”