Collateral damage study: Lockdowns claimed 170,000 lives in the U.S. alone

The U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research has analyzed the death toll in the Covid years 2020 and 2021 compared to previous years.

pandemic covid, Collateral damage study: Lockdowns claimed 170,000 lives in the U.S. alone

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – For critics of the “pandemic” policy, there is no question that the Covid measures not only destroyed countless lives but, in some cases, also extinguished them.

However, it is difficult to quantify the casualties of the lockdowns. The U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research has analyzed the death toll in the Covid years 2020 and 2021 compared to previous years. The result: in the U.S. alone, the lockdowns likely claimed 170,000 lives.

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Among other things, people died of increased heart disease (which can also be seen as an indication of vaccine side effects), diabetes, and the consequences of obesity. Drug- and alcohol-induced deaths also increased.

Union square, New York City. (Photo internet reproduction)
Union square, New York City. (Photo internet reproduction)

Homicides also increased – as did traffic fatalities. What’s striking here is that while Covid-19 primarily posed a risk to the elderly, the increased non-Covid deaths affected all age groups, 18 and older.

The authors conclude the following:

“Summing our estimates across causes and age groups, we estimate 171,000 excess nonCovid deaths through the end of 2021 plus 72,000 unmeasured Covid deaths. The Economist has assembled national-level mortality data from around the world and obtains a similar U.S. estimate of 199,000 (including any unmeasured Covid) or about 60 persons per 100,000 population (Global Change Data Lab 2022). For the European Union as a whole, the estimate is near-identical at 64 non-Covid excess deaths per 100K. In contrast, the estimate for Sweden is -33, meaning that non-Covid causes of death were somewhat low during the pandemic. We suspect that some of the international differences are due to the standard used to designate a death as Covid, but perhaps also Sweden’s result is related to minimizing the disruption of its citizen’s normal lifestyles.”

Source (p. 13)

EU countries with stringent measures thus performed similarly abysmally – Sweden, on the other hand, which largely eschewed harsh restrictions, saw a slight decrease in noncovid deaths.